What Are the Different Types of Plastics | 7 Types of Plastic and Categories

Imagine a world without plastic. It’s a difficult picture to paint, given the ubiquity of this versatile material in our daily lives. From the soda bottle you grab on a scorching day to the milk jug in your refrigerator, plastics surround us.

But what if I told you that plastic isn’t just one homogeneous substance? Welcome to Plastic on Plastics, where Tristan is your guide to unraveling the mysteries of the seven different types of plastic categories.

1. Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET)

1. Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET)

Our journey begins with PET, also known as number one plastic. Picture the soda bottles that have quenched your thirst countless times. PET is highly recognizable for its use in these containers.

Not only is it widespread, but it’s also remarkably eco-friendly with a recycling rate of around 30 percent. Tristan highlights the simplicity of recycling PET, making it a beacon of sustainability in the plastic world.

2. High-Density Polyethylene (HDPE)

2. High-Density Polyethylene (HDPE)

Next on the list is HDPE, or high-density polyethylene. This sturdy plastic finds its way into chemical containers, milk jugs, and even window spray bottles.

Tristan emphasizes HDPE’s strength, showcasing its ability to withstand the weight of a gallon of milk in a relatively light container. With a recycling rate of around 25 percent, HDPE proves to be a reliable and recyclable material.

3. Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC)

Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC)

Enter PVC, a plastic familiar to those who have ventured into construction projects. From pipes to rain gutters, PVC serves diverse roles.

However, its recycling rate is relatively low, often hovering around one percent. Tristan sheds light on the challenges posed by the nature of PVC applications, making recycling a formidable task.

4. Low-Density Polyethylene (LDPE)

4. Low-Density Polyethylene (LDPE)

LDPE, the softer counterpart of HDPE, takes the stage as number four plastic. Recognizable in everyday items like Ziploc bags and grocery bags, LDPE is versatile.

Tristan delves into the ongoing challenge of sorting between similar plastics like HDPE and LDPE, showcasing the complexities of recycling in a world filled with similar-looking materials.

5. Polypropylene (PP)

5. Polypropylene (PP)

Polypropylene, or PP, emerges as an all-around plastic, finding its place in cosmetic containers, auto applications, and more. Despite its widespread use, recycling PP presents a challenge, with a rate of around five percent.

Tristan explores the intricacies of recycling polypropylene, highlighting the need for a standardized approach to increase its recycling rate in the future.

6. Polystyrene (PS)

6. Polystyrene (PS)

Number six introduces us to polystyrene, famously known as Styrofoam. Tristan reveals the environmental challenges posed by this brittle plastic, emphasizing its rapid breakdown into microplastics, making reclamation nearly impossible.

Recycling polystyrene demands individual sorting, adding another layer of complexity to its environmental impact.

7. Other (Miscellaneous Plastics)

7. Other (Miscellaneous Plastics)

The final category, number seven, encompasses a variety of plastics, including BPA and PLA. PLA, touted as a biodegradable plastic, faces challenges due to its grouping with other number seven plastics, leading to low recyclability.

Tristan sheds light on the struggle of sorting plastics and the impact of color on recyclability, with darker colors facing greater challenges.

Conclusion: Navigating the Plastic Landscape

In this journey through the seven types of plastic, Tristan has illuminated the diverse world of plastics, each with its unique properties and challenges.

As we navigate a world filled with plastic, the question arises: How can we better manage and recycle these materials to create a more sustainable future?

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